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MMR, Single Vaccines And MMRV Vaccine

“Live virus vaccines against influenza or poliomyelitis may in each instance pro­duce the disease it intended to prevent—the live virus against measles and mumps may produce such side effects as encephalitis (brain damage)” – Jonas Salk

(Inventor of Polio Vaccine – Science, 4th March 1977).

 

“Live virus vaccines against influenza or poliomyelitis may in each instance pro­duce the disease it intended to prevent—the live virus against measles and mumps may produce such side effects as encephalitis (brain damage)” – Jonas Salk

(Inventor of Polio Vaccine – Science, 4th March 1977)

There are many cases of the MMR vaccine being more dangerous than the illness:

MMRV (measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox vaccine) and Febrile Seizures Link

An interim synthesis of the evidence for febrile seizure risk following MMRV (ProQuad, Merck) vaccination indicates there is a causal relationship between receipt of the first dose of the vaccine and an increased risk for febrile seizures 5–12 days following vaccination, when compared with separate dosing for the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine, and the varicella (V) vaccine provided at the same visit, Dr. Karen Broder of the CDC Immunization Safety Office told ACIP at its fall meeting.

Speaking on behalf of the working group, Dr. Broder said that during the 5- to 12-day postvaccination period, one additional febrile seizure may be expected to occur per approximately 1,900–2,600 children vaccinated.

However, because the evidence is insufficient to conclude whether the risk is increased during days 13–30 following vaccination, the evidence also is insufficient to conclude whether the overall risk is increased within 30 days of vaccination, she said.

The findings are based on the results of two unpublished postlicensure studies of dose 1 ProQuad, including final results on febrile seizures from a Merck-sponsored study, and preliminary findings of a Vaccine and Safety Datalink Project.

The working group considered the biological plausibility of an increased risk with MMRV vaccination vs. MMR + V vaccination, as well as population-based risk.

Next, the group plans to evaluate the clinical importance of febrile seizures. It also proposed an epidemiological study in the Vaccine Safety Datalink population to assess confirmed febrile seizure risk after dose 1 MMRV vaccine in periods other than those already studied—such as in the entire 0- to 30-day postvaccine period.

Source: Pediatric News, volume 42, issue 12, page 2, December 2008.

Do we even need vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella? Measles in healthy, well nourished children used to be a very common and mild illness. After the measles vaccine was introduced in the early 60’s in the US and 1968 in the UK – followed by the MMR in 1988, the disease suddenly became more serious. According to the BMA Complete Family Medical Encyclopaedia, 1995: ‘measles is a potentially dangerous viral illness…prevention of measles is important because it can have rare but serious complications…it is sometimes fatal in children with impaired immunity.’

Clearly, you can see vaccine marketing techniques at play here.

Andrew Wakefield, the gastroenterologist who first discovered a link between the MMR vaccine, crohn’s disease and autism, recently went before the General Medical Council (GMC) accused of professional misconduct for daring to suggest that there is anything wrong with vaccination.

This approach serves to heighten public concern as many wonder why the DOH refuse to look at any opposing evidence or have a rational discussion of the issues. If a person had an allergic reaction to paracetamol, this would be accepted. So are the dangers of mercury fillings, which are now not recommended for pregnant women. When it comes to vaccines, however, it is a sacred cow that no one is allowed to question.

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